Turkey

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Policy Categorization

Administrative

TR-1: Energy Efficiency Law

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TR-2: Energy Efficiency Strategy

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TR-3: Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EU Ecodesign Directive)

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TR-6: Program for Improving Energy Efficiency - Action Plan

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Information & Outreach

TR-4: Energy Management Training Program

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TR-9: Improving Energy Efficiency in Industry Project (sponsored by UNDP, UNIDO & GEF)

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TR-7: Energy Efficiency Awareness Program

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Economic

TR-5: Energy Efficiency Support for SMEs

Policy Sub-Type: Incentives & Subsidies  ·  Policy Pyramid:

TR-8: Energy Efficiency Incentive & Financing Programs

Policy Sub-Type: Incentives & Subsidies  ·  Policy Pyramid:

External Resources

World Bank Group (2015). Institutional Review of Energy Efficiency in Turkey (PDF | 3.39mb)

The World Bank conducted an EE institutional review in consultation with the Turkish Government with the objective to enhance their ability to more effectively manage EE policies and programs and thus contribute to helping meet its stated national EE targets. The review consisted of a detailed assessment of the current institutional set-up, including roles and responsibilities for EE in Turkey, along with a comparison with international experience and best practices. A final set of institutional options and recommendations are provided at the end of the report.

Main Industry Characteristics

Energy use in Turkey’s industrial sector accounts for one-third of the country’s total final energy use. The type of energy used is evenly distributed among coal, natural gas, and electricity. Iron and steel manufacturing consumes the most energy, followed by construction, non-metallic minerals (mostly cement), and chemical manufacturing. Figure 1 shows Turkey’s energy use broken down by industry subsector and fuel type.  

Figure 1. Turkey’s 2012 Industrial Energy Consumption  

 

Source: International Energy Agency, 2014. “World Energy Balance”

Turkey imports three-quarters of its energy supply, and the Turkish economy is growing fast (5% between 2002 and 2012). Therefore, increasing energy productivity is one of the country’s main objectives, to improve energy security, reduce pollution, and increase industry competitiveness. 

 

Final Energy Consumption: 70,550.40 (ktoe) Compare all Countries

Sectoral Contribution

Sector ktoe
Agriculture, Forestry & Fishing 4,958.70
Construction 2,604.40
Mining & Quarrying 130.60
Manufacturing 19,988.90
Transport 14,630.60
Residential 22,453.40
Services 5,692.80
Other 91.00
TOTAL 70,550.40
See Chart

2012 [1]

Sub-sector Contribution to Manufacturing Industry

Sector ktoe
Chemicals 1,428.00
Equipment & Machinery 519.00
Food & Tobacco 1,477.20
Iron & Steel 3,919.90
Non-Ferrous Metals 709.80
Non-Metallic Minerals 2,296.10
Other Manufacturing 7,097.60
Paper & Printing 345.40
Textile & Leather 1,723.90
Wood 472.10
TOTAL 19,989.00
Back to Chart

2012

Direct CO2 Emissions Only: 265.50 (MtCO2) Compare all Countries

Sectoral Contribution

Sector MtCO2
Agriculture, Forestry & Fishing 13.70
Autoproducers 11.20
Construction 9.30
Manufacturing 41.50
Mining & Quarrying 0.10
Other 0.10
Other Energy Industries 10.90
Public Electricity & Heat 89.10
Residential 40.90
Services 4.70
Transport 44.00
TOTAL 265.50
See Chart

2010 [2]

Sub-sector Contribution to Manufacturing Industry

Sector MtCO2
Chemicals 3.00
Equipment & Machinery 0.30
Food & Tobacco 3.00
Iron & Steel 9.30
Non-Ferrous Metals 1.40
Non-Metallic Minerals 3.50
Other Manufacturing 18.30
Other Energy Industries 10.90
Paper & Printing 0.40
Textile & Leather 1.40
Wood 1.20
TOTAL 52.70
Back to Chart

2010 [3]

References

[1] IEA Energy Statistics © OECD/International Energy Agency, 2012. IEA Energy Balances

[2] Calculated based on: IEA energy data (IEA Energy Statistics © OECD/International Energy Agency, 2012. IEA Energy Balances) x IPCC emission factors (IPPC, 2006. 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories,

[3] Calculated based on: IEA energy data (IEA Energy Statistics © OECD/International Energy Agency, 2012. IEA Energy Balances) x IPCC emission factors (IPCC, 2006. 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories