United States (Federal)

US-3:Electric Motor Efficiency Standards

Policy Description

Electric Motor Efficiency Standards require motor manufacturers and labellers to certify that their motors meet minimum efficiency values before they are allowed to sell their products.

Description

 

Electric Motor Efficiency Standards require motor manufacturers and labellers to certify that their motors meet minimum efficiency values before they are allowed to sell their products. Electric motors provide more than 80% of the non-vehicular shaft power in the United States, and use upwards of 60% of the nation's electricity as input [1].

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) Section 313 defines energy efficiency standards for general purpose electric motors and specialty motor designs [2]. The standards (amended in May 2012) require electric motors to have a nominal full load efficiency (*1) that is equal to or greater than the energy efficiency defined in National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Standards Publication MG1-2009 (*2) [3] [4] [5]. The standards require manufacturers and private labellers to receive compliance certification (pass/fail) before distributing or importing the motors covered in the standards [6].

The EISA 2007 standards updated the energy efficiency standards for electric motors covered in the Energy Policy Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), which established energy efficiency standards for a large group of industrial equipment, including electric motors [7]. The EPCA standards included all general purpose motors, but excluded “definite purpose motors” (*3) and “special purpose motors” (*4).

Policy Information Expand this section for information on the key features of the policy, such as its date of introduction, categorization, main objective(s) and linkages with other policies.

Policy Categorisation

Policy Instrument Type: Administrative, Standards

Position in the Pyramid

About Us

Participation: Mandatory

Period

Start Date: 1975

Policy Linkages

Supported By Energy Star for Industry Program Effort Defining
Supported By E3: Economy - Energy - Environment Supporting Measure

Agencies Responsible

Department of Energy

Primary Objective: Energy

Objective

The objective of the Electric Motor Efficiency Standards is to improve the efficiency of electric motors in order to conserve energy resources

Target Group

Commercial and industrial users of electric motors

Driver of energy consumption or emissions affected by policy: Total energy use, relative efficiency, and technology implementation rate

Implementation Information Expand this section for information on targets, monitoring, verification and enforcement regimes, and implementation requirements and tools.

Coverage

Definitions for the covered motor categories can be found at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-04/pdf/2012-10434.pdf#page=27 • General Purpose Electric Motors subtype I (all NEMA type motors) [8] • General Purpose Electric Motors subtype II, motors incorporating the design elements of a general purpose electric motor (subtype I) that are configured as one of the following : ­ – U-Frame ­ – NEMA Design C ­ – Closed-coupled pump motor ­ – Footless motor ­ – Vertical solid shaft normal thrust motor (as tested in a horizontal configuration) ­ – 8-pole motor (900 rpm) ­ – Poly-phase motor with voltage of not more than 600 volts (other than 230 or 460 volts) [9] • Fire pump motors • NEMA Design B general purpose electric motors with a power rating of more than 200 horsepower, but not greater than 500 horsepower [10]

Quantitative Target? yes

Target: Based on type of electric motor and NEMA MG-1 (2009)

Progress Monitored? yes

Verification Required? yes

Enforced? yes

Sanctions: Motors that do not comply do not receive the compliance certification that is needed to sell or import the products

Requirements on the Target Group

Meet the minimum standards required

Support by Government

The U.S. Department of Energy provides compliance certification when the motors abide by the nominal full load efficiency requirement in 10 CFR Part 431 [11]

Implementation Toolbox

Complexity of Implementation

Government

The government must determine appropriate nominal full load efficiencies that attempt to maximize energy savings while minimizing burden on private sector

Target Group

Meeting nominal full load efficiencies in order to obtain certification can be challenging depending on the technology and stringency of the standards.

Impacts, Costs & Benefits Expand this section to find information on policy effectiveness and efficiency.

Impact Quantitative Estimate Qualitative Estimate
Estimated effect on energy consumption or emissions ­• A DOE analysis estimated that the EISA electric motor efficiency standards will save 0.14 Quads of energy from 2008 to 2038 [12] ­• A DOE analysis estimated that the EISA electric motor efficiency standards will reduce emissions by 2.3 MMTCE (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent) from 2008 to 2038 [13]
Estimated costs/benefits for industry • ­DOE estimated that the electric motor efficiency standards net cost to U.S. companies is approximately $0.6-$1 billion from 2008-2038 to comply with the updated EISA standards [14]
Estimated cost for government

References & Footnotes

References

[1] “Motors.” American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy http://aceee.org/topics/motors

[2] "Energy Efficiency Standards for Certain Commercial and Industrial Electric Motors." Unified Agenda 1904-AC28. Federal Register. .

[3] "Frequently Asked Questions: Ensuring Compliance with EISA 2007 Standards for Electric Motors." Department of Energy. .

[4] "Electric Motors." Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy. Department of Energy. .

[5] “PART 431—Energy Efficiency Program For Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment.” < http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-04/pdf/2012-10434.pdf#page=27>

[6] "Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007." One Hundred Tenth Congress of the United States of America. .

[7] "Energy Efficiency Standards for Certain Commercial and Industrial Electric Motors." Unified Agenda 1904-AC28. Federal Register. .

[8] "Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007." One Hundred Tenth Congress of the United States of America. .

[9] “PART 431—Energy Efficiency Program For Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment.” < http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-04/pdf/2012-10434.pdf#page=27>

[10] "Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007." One Hundred Tenth Congress of the United States of America. .

[11] "Frequently Asked Questions: Ensuring Compliance with EISA 2007 Standards for Electric Motors." Department of Energy. .

[12] "Technical Support Document: Impacts on the Nation of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007." Department of Energy, Mar. 2009.

[13] "Technical Support Document: Impacts on the Nation of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007." Department of Energy, Mar. 2009.

[14] "Technical Support Document: Impacts on the Nation of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007." Department of Energy, Mar. 2009.

[15] "42 U.S.C. § 6311 : US Code - Section 6311: Definitions." FindLaw. .

[16] "NEMA Publishes NEMA MG 1-2011 Motors and Generators." NEMA. 9 Jan. 2012. < http://www.nema.org/News/Pages/NEMA-Publishes-NEMA-MG-1-2011-Motors-and-Generators.aspx>.

[17] "42 U.S.C. § 6311 : US Code - Section 6311: Definitions." FindLaw. .

[18] "42 U.S.C. § 6311 : US Code - Section 6311: Definitions." FindLaw. .

Footnotes

(*1) The term “nominal full load efficiency” means the average efficiency (ratio of an electric motor’s useful power output to its total power input) of a population of motors of duplicate design [15].

(*2) Requirements as amended in 2012. NEMA is the association of electrical equipment manufacturers which provides a forum for the development of technical standards that are in the best interests of the industry and users. Specifically, MG-1 is the definitive standard for practical information concerning performance, safety, testing, construction, and manufacture of alternating-current and direct-current motors and generators [16].

(*3) The term "definite purpose motor" means any motor designed in standard ratings with standard operating characteristics or standard mechanical construction for use under service conditions other than usual or for use on a particular type of application and which cannot be used in most general purpose applications [17].

(*4) The term "special purpose motor" means any motor, other than a general purpose motor or definite purpose motor, which has special operating characteristics or special mechanical construction, or both, designed for a particular application [18].