United States (Federal)

US-11:State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action)

Policy Description

SEE Action is a state and local-led effort facilitated by federal agencies to take energy efficiency to scale and achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency opportunities by 2020. SEE Action offers information resources and technical assistance to state and local decision makers on successful approaches to energy efficiency policies and programs through eight working groups. One of the working groups, the Industrial Energy Efficiency and Combined Heat and Power (IEE/CHP) Working Group, is providing guidance on model programs and policies that support industrial efficiency and implementation of CHP.

Description

 

The State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action) is a state and local-led effort facilitated by federal agencies to take energy efficiency to scale and achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2020 [1]. SEE Action offers information resources and technical assistance to state and local decision makers on successful approaches to energy efficiency policies and programs through eight working groups, as shown in the diagram below [2]:

The Industrial Energy Efficiency and Combined Heat and Power (IEE/CHP) Working Group focuses on improving energy efficiency in the U.S. manufacturing/industrial sector [3]. It supports and assists with the creation and implementation of policies, programs and practices which work towards its two national goals [4]:

  • A 2.5% average annual reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2020
  • Installation of 40 gigawatts (GW) of new, cost-effective CHP by 2020

The working group is striving to meet these goals by:

  • Driving demand for IEE and CHP
  • Building the workforce
  • Promoting efficient operations and investment
  • Moving the market toward adoption of CHP technologies

SEE Action builds on the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency, a former private-public initiative to create a sustainable, aggressive national commitment to energy efficiency through the collaborative efforts of gas and electric utilities, utility regulators, and other partner organizations.

Policy Information Expand this section for information on the key features of the policy, such as its date of introduction, categorization, main objective(s) and linkages with other policies.

Policy Categorisation

Policy Instrument Type: Information & Outreach

Position in the Pyramid

About Us

Participation: Voluntary

Period

Start Date: 2011

Policy Linkages

Supports Executive Order 13624 Effort Defining
Supports Better Buildings, Better Plants Effort Defining
Supports Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Partnership Effort Defining

Agencies Responsible

Department of Energy
Environmental Protection Agency

Primary Objective: Energy

Objective

The main objective of the IEE/CHP working group is to achieve 2.5% average annual reduction in industrial energy intensity, and install 40 GW of CHP

Target Group

The IEE/CHP Working Group of SEE Action covers “all facilities and equipment used for production, processing or assembling goods” [5]. Key stakeholders include: ­ • Industrial Manufacturing of all sizes (large, medium and small) and varying levels of energy intensity.[6] ­ • State and Local government ­ • Utilities ­ • National / Non-profit Organizations

Driver of energy consumption or emissions affected by policy: Relative efficiency, technology implementation rate, knowledge level

Implementation Information Expand this section for information on targets, monitoring, verification and enforcement regimes, and implementation requirements and tools.

Coverage

Quantitative Target? yes

Target: • Achieve a 2.5% average annual reduction in industrial energy intensity through 2020 • Install 40 gigawatts (GW) of new, cost-effective CHP by 2020

Progress Monitored? yes

Verification Required? no

Enforced? no

Sanctions: N/A

Requirements on the Target Group

 

The target group can help achieve the goals by many different actions.

  • The industry/manufacturing sector can provide feedback, attend workshops, utilize and promote licensing and certification programs, and host technology demonstration events.
  • State and Local governments can promote and adopt the Working Groups recommendations within state/region, inform the working group of existing successful programs/policies/incentives within state/region, and enhance data collection.
  • Utilities can coordinate with regulators on strategies to overcome issues, inform working group of existing incentives, enhance data collection, and develop training on IEE and CHP.
  • National/Nonprofit Organizations can promote national energy policies/programs which encourage IEE and CHP, hold educational workshops for regulators and legislators on model policies, develop training on IEE and CHP, and promote accepted protocols to increase standardized adoption of certifications/licensing. [7]

Support by Government

 

The role of the government is to support and assist with the creation and implementation of supporting policies, programs and practices. Specifically the government provides support by:

  • Identifying and filling needs in available key information and information resources
  • Collecting and compiling information on model programs and policies
  • Promoting and piloting the identified program policies
  • Engaging states, utilities, and industry on improvements of financing and incentives for industrial EE and CHP
  • Completing development of new tools as technical solutions
    • Case studies / white papers
    • Training/Workshops
    • Information Clearinghouse [8]

 

Implementation Toolbox

 

The IEE/CHP Working Group provides many resources for state/local governments, utilities, national/non-profit organizations and manufacturers. These resources were created to help with the creation of new, successful state and utility IEE and CHP programs and policies. The resources listed below are both existing and planned resources:

  • An Industrial Energy Efficiency Best Practice Programs Guide and Guide to the Successful Implementation of State CHP Policies will provide successful policy and program approaches to industrial energy efficiency and CHP by utilities and state and local governments.
  • Regional Manufacturing Stakeholders Workshops bring together regulators, program administrators, utilities, measurement and verification experts, state officials, and manufacturers to address barriers to IEE and CHP programs and policies through actionable solutions, http://www1.eere.energy.gov/seeaction/events.html.
  • The IEE/CHP Webinar Series features expert speakers discussing ways to advance energy efficiency policies and programs, remove barriers, and grow state and local investment in IEE and CHP in the industrial sector [9]., http://www1.eere.energy.gov/seeaction/events.html.

Complexity of Implementation

Government

This initiative is reasonably complex given the coordination of workshops involving key stakeholders; provision of information resources and technical support; and encouragement of action at the State and Local levels.

Target Group

Industrial companies can participate on a voluntary basis and gain access to technical support and informational resources, though engagement with State and Local level institutions and utilities adds some complexity for the target group.

Impacts, Costs & Benefits Expand this section to find information on policy effectiveness and efficiency.

Impact Quantitative Estimate Qualitative Estimate
Estimated effect on energy consumption or emissions If the national goal is reached by 2020, the result would be: ­•10.4 quads of energy saved by 2020 [10] –10.4 Quads is 78% of the total estimated potential energy reduction in the industrial sector by 2020 (13.4 quads). [11] ­• More than 150 million metric tons of CO2 emissions mitigated as a result of the installation of 40 GW of new, cost-effective CHP alone [12]
Estimated costs/benefits for industry If the national goal is reached by 2020, the result will be: • $37 billion saved per year in industrial energy [13]
Estimated cost for government

References & Footnotes

References

[1] "SEE Action." .

[2] Currier, Todd, and Greg White. "Industrial Energy Efficiency/CHP Working Group Executive Summary." SEE Action, 25 Mar. 2011. .

[3] "Industrial Energy Efficiency and Combined Heat and Power Working Group." SEE Action. .

[4] "State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action) Industrial Energy Efficiency (IEE) and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Working Group." SEE Action, June 2011. .

[5] "Glossary." U.S. Energy Information Administration. .

[6] "State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action) Industrial Energy Efficiency (IEE) and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Working Group." SEE Action, June 2011. .

[7] "State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action) Industrial Energy Efficiency (IEE) and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Working Group." SEE Action, June 2011. .

[8] Currier, Todd, and Greg White. "Industrial Energy Efficiency/CHP Working Group Executive Summary." SEE Action, 25 Mar. 2011. .

[9] "Fact Sheet: Industrial Energy Efficiency and CHP Working Group." SEE Action, July 2012. .

[10] "Fact Sheet: Industrial Energy Efficiency and CHP Working Group." SEE Action, July 2012. .

[11] "Fact Sheet: Industrial Energy Efficiency and CHP Working Group." SEE Action, July 2012. .

[12] "Fact Sheet: Industrial Energy Efficiency and CHP Working Group." SEE Action, July 2012. .

[13] "Fact Sheet: Industrial Energy Efficiency and CHP Working Group." SEE Action, July 2012. .